World

Science increases age. While many do not care for their parents, some even do not see their father, grand father, father in law who has left life but is about to leave this earth.
If this behaviour spreads, world will be a dangerous place.

World population

Deaths

Earth
The diameter of the earth at the equator is 7,926.41 miles (12,756.32 kilometers).
If you measure the earth through the poles the diameter is a bit shorter - 7,901 miles (12,715.43 km).
Thus the earth is a tad wider (25 miles / 41 km) than it is tall, giving it a slight bulge at the equator.
This shape is known as an ellipsoid or more properly, geoid (earth-like).
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Discovery Date of Discovery : Unknown         Discovered By : Known by the Ancients
Mass Metric: 5,972,190,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg    Scientific Notation: 5.9722 x 1024 kg
Surface Area Metric: 510,064,472 km2   English: 196,936,994 square miles 
Atmospheric Constituents
Nitrogen, Oxygen    Scientific Notation: N2, O2    By Comparison: N2 is 80% of Earth's air and is a crucial element in DNA.

Climate Deal Analysis: The Good, the Bad, the Still Unknown
PARIS — First, the good news: On Saturday afternoon, world leaders ratified a universal pact to slow global warming, ending a decades-long political stalemate and, according to the best possible science, lowering the risk of ecological collapse.

The decisive moment arrived inside a high-security airplane hangar on the outskirts of Paris, where delegates from nearly 200 nations fought over the deal line-by-line for two weeks. Finally, the French foreign minister called an all-hands meeting, and asked if there were any objections to the final 31-page agreement.
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Globally, the 20th century was marked by: (a) two devastating world wars; (b) the Great Depression of the 1930s; (c) the end of vast colonial empires; (d) rapid advances in science and technology, from the first airplane flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina (US) to the landing on the moon; (e) the Cold War between the Western alliance and the Warsaw Pact nations; (f) a sharp rise in living standards in North America, Europe, and Japan; (g) increased concerns about environmental degradation including deforestation, energy and water shortages, declining biological diversity, and air pollution; (h) the onset of the AIDS epidemic; and (i) the ultimate emergence of the US as the only world superpower. The planet's population continues to explode: from 1 billion in 1820 to 2 billion in 1930, 3 billion in 1960, 4 billion in 1974, 5 billion in 1987, 6 billion in 1999, and 7 billion in 2012. For the 21st century, the continued exponential growth in science and technology raises both hopes (e.g., advances in medicine and agriculture) and fears (e.g., development of even more lethal weapons of war).