CSRidentity
 
Traditional Medicine
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We plan to have 8 content partners and are identifying them through our research.
The content partner will be one NGO / NPO from 6 continents (Oceania - Australasia, Asia, Africa, Europe, North America & South America) plus one each from India & Thane.
We know that as of now, there does not exist an NGO / NPO in Antarctica continent.
We plan to provide one free banner to 6 continent content partners. This will be either the name of the NGO or their logo and the size of each banner will be 190 px width and 30 px height.
The banner for NGO in Asia will be from countries other than India because India & Thane are our global examples and we will give a banner of 502 px x 40 px each to an NGO from India & Thane at the top of this folder.
All the 8 banners will be from now to March 2018.

Traditional Medicine: Definitions

The following terms are extracted from the General Guidelines for Methodologies on Research and Evaluation of Traditional Medicine.

Click here to view entire document [PDF 216KB]
Traditional medicine
Traditional medicine is the sum total of the knowledge, skills, and practices based on the theories, beliefs, and experiences indigenous to different cultures, whether explicable or not, used in the maintenance of health as well as in the prevention, diagnosis, improvement or treatment of physical and mental illness.

Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM)
The terms "complementary medicine" or "alternative medicine" are used inter-changeably with traditional medicine in some countries. They refer to a broad set of health care practices that are not part of that country's own tradition and are not integrated into the dominant health care system.

Herbal medicines
Herbal medicines include herbs, herbal materials, herbal preparations and finished herbal products, that contain as active ingredients parts of plants, or other plant materials, or combinations.

  • Herbs: crude plant material such as leaves, flowers, fruit, seed, stems, wood, bark, roots, rhizomes or other plant parts, which may be entire, fragmented or powdered.
  • Herbal materials: in addition to herbs, fresh juices, gums, fixed oils, essential oils, resins and dry powders of herbs. In some countries, these materials may be processed by various local procedures, such as steaming, roasting, or stir-baking with honey, alcoholic beverages or other materials.
  • Herbal preparations: the basis for finished herbal products and may include comminuted or powdered herbal materials, or extracts, tinctures and fatty oils of herbal materials. They are produced by extraction, fractionation, purification, concentration, or other physical or biological processes. They also include preparations made by steeping or heating herbal materials in alcoholic beverages and/or honey, or in other materials.
  • Finished herbal products: herbal preparations made from one or more herbs. If more than one herb is used, the term mixture herbal product can also be used. Finished herbal products and mixture herbal products may contain excipients in addition to the active ingredients. However, finished products or mixture products to which chemically defined active substances have been added, including synthetic compounds and/or isolated constituents from herbal materials, are not considered to be herbal.

Source

It is not necessary but it will be good if the NGO content provider helps our online research by sharing relevant issue related project in their continent.
They should not give more than 100 words information.
CSRidentity.com will share the information and at the end will share the source (which is name of the relevant NGO content partner and we will link the source to the relevant NGO content provider website).
If the NGO from Asia provides information of a country in Africa continent or any other continent, we will give the NGO from Asia as the source. Which means any content partner from any continent is free to provide information from any other continent and get a link to them as source.

There are two things which we are careful
1) The project mentioned must exist.
2) We will share the project and will not name the name of the organisation which does the project. If anyone is interested, they will communicate with the source (which means our relevant content partner) and not us or the sponsor.

We dont want to dilute the identity of the sponsor of the issue.
Ideally we want the sponsor of the issue to be known for that issue across the world.
Of course, we must mention here that we will name the 8 NGO content partners on the index page of the relevant issue with link to their website.
As a responsible organisation, our editorial has a defined view on the type of NGO here. Our email id is Datacentre.