CSRidentity
 
 
Our plan : In 2016-18, we plan to share issue programmes of governments, corporates, NGOs, FAs... in any country with focus on Thane, other districts of India.
Our vision : Universal development Our mission : Be sustainable, promote others Our focus : Share challenges & solutions email your programmes on issues
Energyprogrammes Energy: Funding proposals by various stakeholders

How much energy is consumed in the world by each sector?
World marketed energy consumption was about 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2011.1 The commercial sector, industrial sector, residential sector, and transportation sector are the four major energy end-use sectors. The electric power sector also consumes energy. The electricity produced by the electric power sector is consumed by the other end-use sectors. There are also losses in electricity generation, transmission, and distribution. The electricity consumed by the four major energy end-use sectors and electricity losses can be apportioned to these respective end-use sectors to calculate their total energy use. Losses are the difference between the amount of energy used to generate electricity and the energy content of the electricity consumed at the point of end use.
Source

AID India

NGO

Energy is needed for basic activities like home-lighting, cooking etc. In India 56% of rural households (and 40% of all households) are unelectrified. While the country has installed over 135,000 MW of power plants, and generation is growing by 6-7% annually, it doesnt translate to equity in distribution. We find that even ensuring basic connectivity of all households to the grid or to alternate sources where grid is not available, is not a priority in government's policy and implementation, and is the major reason why people are living in darkness (see map ).

AID's work in partnership with people and groups in India has focussed on understanding electrification and other energy needs of the underpriveleged sections, recognizing their capability to pay for energy usage provided the energy sources are available to them, and coming up with innovative solutions.

AIDing VILLAGES CONNECTED TO THE GRID
Srikakulam Rural Development Project: Ironically, the majority of the unelectrified households in India are in villages that are already connected to the grid (officially it requires only 10% of households to be powered to declare a village electrified ). At an extremely low cost of about $2000 per year, AID has enabled nearly 1000 households across 25 such villages to get electricity connections in the past 3-4 years. This model is replicable and can be used all over India.

A survey conducted by AID-India Srikakulam, indicated that those without electricity were spending Rs 30-40 per month on kerosene (3-4 litres at Rs 11/liter) for oil lamps, while those with one or two tubelights in the same villages, had monthly bills of Rs 40 for about 20 units of electricity they consumed [2004-05 prices]. Thus even poor people had the capacity to pay their monthly bills, and what was keeping their homes dark was their inability to pay the one time Rs 1000-3000 bribe for securing an initial connection. Having found that it was not poverty but exploitation that was keeping homes dark, AID-India volunteers along with 20 village people who did not have electricity, fought the bribes and secured 20 connections without bribes. Since then more people have joined the campaign and by 2008, over 700 connections were facilitated by AID-India in Srikakulam district.

AIDing VILLAGES NOT CONNECTED TO THE GRID
Pedal Power: Motivated by children literally burning the midnight oil before exams, in remote areas of Narmada valley where despite the Sardar Sarovar dam there is no plan to connect the valley villages to the grid, a pedal power generator was designed by AID volunteers, where children could light up their classrooms by pedalling.

Bilgaon Micro: AID supported a microhydro project in the village Bilgaon where the energy of a local waterfalls was tapped lighting about 200 households. The project done in collaboration with Bombay Sarvodaya Friendship Centre, People's School of Energy and shramdaan provided by the Narmada Valley residents.

Biogas, Wind and Solar: AID initiated collaborations between Mozda Collective in Gujarat, Narmada Support Group in Dhule, Maharshtra and AID-India, Orissa Chapter with Engineers Without Borders and students of US universities that strengthened existing ideas in all partners and led to design and fabrication of a biogas electricity generation plant, wind turbine and solar LED lights.

In addition AID has supported projects in diverse areas of alternate energy.

Source

More programmes of various stakeholders are accessible to content members.

Website : http://www.aidindia.org/main/

CREDA

NGO

Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) was launched by Ministry of Power, Government of India in May 2007, as a first step towards promoting energy efficiency in the building sector. The Ministry of Power, Govt. of India is implementing ECBC in the States of India in consultation with the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) (Govt. of India, Ministry of Power). The ECBC was developed under the guidelines of BEE with significant inputs from various other stakeholders such as practicing architects, consultants, educational institutions and other government organizations. The purpose of ECBC is to provide minimum requirements for energy efficient design and construction of buildings and their systems without compromising on the comfort of the occupants.

The ECBC provides design norms for:

Building envelope, including thermal performance requirements for walls, roofs, and windows;
Lighting system, including day lighting, lamps and luminaries’ performance requirements;
HVAC system, including energy performance of air distribution systems;
Electrical system; and
Water heating and pumping systems, including requirements for solar hot-water systems.
As per the Section 15 (a) of Energy Conservation Act, 2001, the State Governments are required to amend the ECBC based on the climatic conditions of the State. Furthermore, Chhattisgarh State Renewable Energy Development Agency (CREDA) is the State Designated Agency (SDA) to implement energy conservation activities of Ministry of Power, Govt. of India and Energy Conservation Act 2001 in the State of Chhattisgarh. As per BEE guidelines, CREDA has prepared draft "Chhattisgarh State Energy Conservation Building Code (CGECBC)" according to the climatic condition of Chhattisgarh State.

The CGECBC follows the same structures as the National ECBC. New sections have been added to include auditing, reporting and star rating of building, renewable energy, IS 3792-1978, etc. so as ensure that the applicable buildings adhere to the code.

Source

More programmes of various stakeholders are accessible to content members.

Website : http://www.creda.in/

Dupont India Private Limited.

Corporate

Discovering Global Energy Solutions
Together we can build a secure energy future.
By 2035, global demand for energy will increase by 36%. DuPont is uniquely positioned to address the rising demand for secure, environmentally sustainable, and affordable global energy solutions, as well as the need for worldwide energy conservation.

By applying our deep knowledge of and experience in microbiology, fermentation, polymer science, and electrochemistry, we are helping to make cars lighter, fuels cleaner, and sustainable energy sources, such as the sun, easier to harness — global energy solutions that contribute to a brighter energy future.

Source

More programmes of various stakeholders are accessible to content members.

Website : http://www.dupont.co.in/

Bharti Airtel

Corporate

In Srilanka
Airtel Sri Lanka has taken various initiatives to embed sustainability into their operations. Its relentless pursuit of deploying Hybrid DG, Free cooling units instead of air-conditioners and Intelligent TRX power shut-down are all aimed at conserving power and energy. Tower consolidation and reduction of emissions are some other practices adopted by Airtel that positively impact the community. The use of Microsoft Lync to conduct training via video calls, and tower infrastructure sharing ensures a greener, cleaner environment and cost-effectiveness.

In Africa
Airtel is exploring alternative forms of power supply in Africa, which include hybrid battery banks and solar/ wind power. Over the last few months, 105 solar sites have already been set up in Nigeria, reducing the use of diesel generators from 24 hours a day to 3 to 4 hours a day. By 2013, Airtel aims to completely eradicate the constant use of diesel to power its network.

Source

More programmes of various stakeholders are accessible to content members.

Address
Bharti Airtel Limited
A Bharti Enterprise
Bharti Crescent
1, Nelson Mandela Road
Vasant Kunj, Phase II
New Delhi – 110 070

 

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