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Our plan : In 2016-18, we plan to share issue programmes of governments, corporates, NGOs, FAs... in any country with focus on Thane, other districts of India.
Our vision : Universal development Our mission : Be sustainable, promote others Our focus : Share challenges & solutions email your programmes on issues
Drinking water

Intro
The safety and accessibility of drinking-water are major concerns throughout the world. Health risks may arise from consumption of water contaminated with infectious agents, toxic chemicals, and radiological hazards. Improving access to safe drinking-water can result in tangible improvements to health. The quality of drinking-water is a powerful environmental determinant of health. Assurance of drinking-water safety is a foundation for the prevention and control of waterborne diseases.

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Facts About Water & Sanitation
663 million people - 1 in 10 - lack access to safe water.
2.4 billion people - 1 in 3 - lack access to a toilet.
Twice the population of the United States lives without access to safe water.
1/3 of the global population lives without access to a toilet.
More people have a mobile phone than a toilet.
A review of rural water system sustainability in eight countries in Africa, South Asia, and Central America found an average water project failure rate of 20 - 40 percent.
Globally, 1/3 of all schools lack access to safe water and adequate sanitation.
In low and middle-income countries, 1/3 of all healthcare facilities lack a safe water source.
The water crisis is the #1 global risk based on impact to society (as a measure of devastation), as announced by the World Economic Forum in January 2015.

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Key facts
In 2015, 91% of the world’s population had access to an improved drinking-water source, compared with 76% in 1990.
2.6 billion people have gained access to an improved drinking-water source since 1990.
4.2 billion people now get water through a piped connection; 2.4 billion access water through other improved sources including public taps, protected wells and boreholes.
663 million people rely on unimproved sources, including 159 million dependent on surface water.
Globally, at least 1.8 billion people use a drinking-water source contaminated with faeces.
Contaminated water can transmit diseases such diarrhoea, cholera, dysentery, typhoid and polio. Contaminated drinking-water is estimated to cause 502 000 diarrhoeal deaths each year.
By 2025, half of the world’s population will be living in water-stressed areas.
In low- and middle-income countries, 38% of health care facilities lack any water source, 19% do not have improved sanitation and 35% lack water and soap for handwashing.

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Water and health
Contaminated water and poor sanitation are linked to transmission of diseases such as cholera, diarrhoea, dysentery, hepatitis A, typhoid and polio. Absent, inadequate, or inappropriately managed water and sanitation services expose individuals to preventable health risks. This is particularly the case in health care facilities where both patients and staff are placed at additional risk of infection and disease when water, sanitation and hygiene services are lacking. Globally, 15% of patients develop an infection during a hospital stay, with the proportion much greater in low-income countries. Inadequate management of urban, industrial and agricultural wastewater means the drinking-water of hundreds of millions of people is dangerously contaminated or chemically polluted.
Some 842 000 people are estimated to die each year from diarrhoea as a result of unsafe drinking-water, sanitation and hand hygiene. But diarrhoea is largely preventable, and the deaths of 361 000 children aged under 5 each year could be avoided each year if these risk factors were addressed. Where water is not readily available, people may decide handwashing is not a priority, thereby adding to the likelihood of diarrhoea and other diseases.

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Having access to basic clean water and a decent toilet saves children's lives, gives women a leg up in earning money and ensures a good food supply. But CARE's work on water isn't just about digging wells or building latrines. We work closely with women to lead their communities in changing critical local practices like hand washing. We work with government to make sure that they have the long-term political commitment, good policies and are allocating resources for lasting improvements. And we link with wider efforts in critical integrated efforts on nutrition, education and adaptation to climatic shocks.
CARE places emphasis on women in all of our water work. That's because impoverished women are disproportionately excluded from decisions regarding water's allocation and management. CARE provides women with equal decision-making power by including them in discussions on water and sanitation on the local, municipal and state levels. Women have more time for income-generating projects and school when they aren't spending hours each day hauling water. Access to safe water results in women spending less time caring for family members who would otherwise fall sick due to unsafe water. Also, improved sanitation can keep a girl in school by making facilities available to her when she reaches puberty.

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Clean water, basic toilets and good hygiene practices are essential for the survival and development of children. Today, there are around 2.4 billion people who do not use improved sanitation, and 663 million who do not have access to improved water sources.
Without these basic needs, the lives of millions of children are at risk. For children under five, water- and sanitation-related diseases are one of the leading causes of death. Every day, over 800 children die from preventable diseases caused by poor water, and a lack of sanitation and hygiene.
UNICEF’s water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) team works in over 100 countries worldwide to improve water and sanitation services, as well as basic hygiene practices. Last year, UNICEF’s efforts provided nearly 14 million people with clean water and over 11 million with basic toilets.
In times of crisis children are particularly vulnerable; UNICEF responds and provides emergency relief to those in need.

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