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Official Website : http://sambalpur.nic.in

Headquarters : Sambalpur
State : Odisha

Area in Sq Km (Census 2011)
Total : 6624
Rural : 6467.75
Urban : 156.25

Population (Census 2011)
Population : 1041099
Rural : 733006
Urban : 308093
Male : 526877
Female : 514222
Sex Ratio (Females per 1000 males) : 976
Density (Total, Persons per sq km) : 157

Helplines :
School Student Helpline- Sampark Online : 18003456722
Local Police Station : 100
Crime Stopper : 1090
Women Help Line : 1091
Children Help Line(CHILDLINE) : 1098
Fire Help Line : 101
Janani Ambulance Help Line : 102
Traffic Help Line : 1095
N.H.A.I. Help Line : 1033
Ambulance Help Line : 108

Population (Census 2010) : The current world population is 7.6 billion (As of 1st July 2018)

Click on the following link to download district statistics as per NITI Ayog website
http://niti.gov.in/file/753/download?token=4gML9z9w

Brief About Sambalpur District
Sambalpur has a history full of events including Indian Freedom Struggle representing the different section of society. For the sake of convenience, however, the history, with special reference to the spark and fire and Nationalism, may be stated briefly.

History has to say that Samudragupta in the 4th century, defeated King Mahendra of Koshala, the kingdom that included Sambalpur. During the 5th and 6th centuries Sambalpur came under the rule of Sarbhapuriyas. Towards the 7th century it passed in to the hands of Panduvansi king Trivaradeva. Towards the close of 9th century king Janmajaya I Mahabhavagupta extended his empire which comprised the modern districts of Sambalpur and Bolangir. Hence forward, his dynasty came to be known as the Samavansi dynasty. During the last part of the Samavansi rule, Sambalpur was occupied by the Kalachuris of Ratnapua. The 13th century saw a bitter fight between the Kalachuris and the Gandas. Later on, the Gandas occupied Sambalpur.

During the middle of the 14th century Ramai Dev laid the foundation of the Chauhan rule in Western Orissa. However, the Chowhan rule came to a close in april,1800, when Sambalpur was occupied by the Marathas. After the British occupied Orissa and bitterness between the British and Marathas ripened, the former found a convenient route via Sambalpur and annihilated the Marathas. Sambalpur was occupied by the British on 2nd January, 1804. Finally it passed on to the Brithish in 1817. The subsequent years witnessed the movements of the Kandhas and Binjhal Zamidars against the British and their poppet ruler in Sambalpur was Rani Mohan Kumari. Although the modern concept of nationalism was not activating force, one could see the spirit of freedom and hatred of foreign rule reflected in the struggle. The period recorded the heroic sage of Surendra Sai. (Most renowned freedom fighter from Western Orissa).

Sambalpur district, the western most district of Orissa, had been named after the headquarters town, Sambalpur. According to Mr. L.S.S.O. Maller, the town derived its name from the presiding goddess Samalai, whose stone image was discovered by Balaram Dev, the first Chowhan king of Sambalpur.

The erstwhile Sambalpur District was divided into four districts namely Sambalpur, Bargarh,Jharsuguda and Deogarh in pursuance of Revenue & Excise Department Resolution No 14993/R Dtd 31.03.93 and Resolution No 56413/R Dtd 22.12.93.Bargarh  district comprising Bargarh and Padampur Subdivision started functioning with effect from 1.4.1993.Jharsuguda and Deogarh District started functioning w.e.f. 1.1.94.

GEOGRAPHY

Sambalpur district lies between 20° 40’ N and 22° 11’ N latitude, 82° 39’ E and 85° 15’ E longitude with a toal area of 6,702 Sq. Kms. The district is surrounded by Deogarh district in the east, Bargarh and Jharsuguda districts in the west, Sundergarh district in the north and Subarnpur and Angul districts in the South. The district has three distinctive physiographic units such as, Hilly Terrain of Bamra and Kuchinda in the north, plateau and ridges of Rairakhol in the south-east and valley and plains of Sambalpur Sub-division in the south east. Sambalpur district experiences extreme type of climate with 66 rainy days and 153 centimeters rainfall on an average per annum. Most of the rainfall is confined to the months from June to October visited by south west monsoon. Mercury rises upto 47° celcius during May with intolerable heat wave and falls as low as 11.8° celcius during December with extreme cold. The rainfall is highly uneven and irregular

The district forms a part of the Mahanadi River basin. The Mahanadi, the longest river of the state, entered into the district in the north western border, where the famous Hirakud Multipurpose Dam Project is built. Other important rivers of the district are the Maltijor, the Harrad, the Kulsara, the Bheden, and the Phuljharan. The district has a total forest area of 3986.27 Sq. Kms. which is 59.46% of the total area of the district. Total land under cultivation in the district is 173540 hectares. Most of the villages of the district are inaccessible during the rainy season. Presence of a number of nallas without bridges cuts off the villages from the nearby roads. The district is served by National Highway No.6, National Highway No.42, Major district roads and a section of South Eastern Railways. Rural electrification has been extended to 63.6% of the villages of the district. Telecommunication Network is not adequate to cater to the needs the people in the rural areas. Drinking water facilities are available in villages mostly from the sources of tubewells.